Wednesday, February 24, 2010

Sign of the Times

Factoid: (sign of the Times)

One measure of real estate activity is the Real Estate Book. This is a national franchised publication to advertise real estate for agents and other real estate professionals. Each book is tailored to local areas.

Here in the Mountains of north Georgia, the last four issues of the Real Estate Book, (issues 21 #10; 21 #11, 21 #12 and 22 #1) contained 48 pages of ads, 40 pages, 32 pages and finally 24 pages respectively. We are now, sadly, referring to it as the Real Estate Pamphlet. Times are still hard.

Tuesday, February 9, 2010

Short Sale Fraud

We have had a lot of questions about "short sales" recently. I came across this article about problems you might encounter in a short sale where there is a second mortgage holder who has to agree to the sale even though there is no money going to that lender. The article is a bit long but I think it is worth it-Byron

Big Banks Accused of Short Sale Fraud
By Diana Olick
CNBC Business Reporter

Just as regulators, lawmakers and all forms of financial oversight boards are talking about new regulations to guard against mortgage fraud and another mortgage meltdown, there appears to be yet a new mortgage fraud out there today, allegedly perpetuated by agents of, yes, the big banks.
I was first alerted to this by Jeremy Brandt, the CEO of several companies that bring short sale agents, investors and sellers together.
His companies include 1800CashOffer, and Brandt has a huge network of short sale real estate agents, and over the past several months he's been receiving all kinds of questions and complaints about trouble with second lien holders.
As we all know, during the housing boom, millions of Americans pulled cash out of their homes in the form of home equity loans and lines of credit. They also used "piggy back" loans in order to get even lower interest rates on their primary mortgages. Now, many of the borrowers in trouble, and many who are so far underwater on their loans that they don't qualify for any refi or modification, are choosing short sales as a way out. (Short sales are when the lender allows the home to be sold for less than the value of the loan). About 12 percent of all home sales by the end of 2009 were short sales, according to the National Association of Realtors.
In order for a short sale with two loans to happen, the second lien holder has to drop the lien. If they don't, and there's no short sale, the home goes to foreclosure and the first lien holder gets the house because second liens are subordinated debt to the primary loan.
In short, the second lien holder gets nothing. In order to get the second lien holder to drop the lien, the first lien holder generally negotiates some partial payment to the second lien holder. The second lien holder doesn't have to agree, but more and more are doing so.
That's all legal.
But here's what's not legal and what's apparently happening quite often recently. Since many second lien holders are getting very little, they are now allegedly requesting money on the side from either real estate agents or the buyers in the short sale. When I say "on the side," I mean in cash, off the HUD settlement statements, so the first lien holder doesn't see it.

They are pretty clear and pretty upfront about the fact that if the first lender knows they are getting paid, the first lender will kill the short sale," says Brandt. "So these second lenders are asking for the payments off the closing documents, off the HUD statement, usually in a cashiers check prior to closing. Once they receive that payment, they will allow the short sale to go through, which according to RESPA laws and the lawyers that we have spoken to on the topic is not legal."

I told RESPA specialist Brian Sullivan over at HUD about all this and he replied, "That's a red flag!"
Clearly illegal.
Most agents wouldn't go on the record with me, for fear of retribution by the banks with whom they have to work every day. But one agent, Kayte Gentry, of Keller Williams Integrity First Realty, was brave enough to blow the whistle.
"I think it's wrong, and I think somebody needs to hold them accountable, and every time I lose a house in foreclosure because of this, it hurts my client," says Gentry matter-of-factly. "Aside from being illegal and a violation of RESPA, it's immoral and truly it's just sad for the client that it's hurting."
Gentry says she has had the requests made three times and claims she lost one sale because of it.
"The big banks that have recently made this request, specifically payments outside of the closing statement have been Citi Mortgage and JP Morgan Chase."
JP Morgan Chase simply answered, "No Comment," when I relayed the charge to their media representative.

When we confront the lenders and tell them that this request is illegal and a violation of RESPA, they tell us it's been cleared through legal and they don't care. Do it anyway," charges Gentry.

I contacted the Treasury Department, HUD, FINCEN (Financial Crimes Enforcement Network) and the Federal Trade Commission, and none of their representatives could tell me of any active investigation into this. The folks at HUD said they'd be very interested to see my story.
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